Sweet and Sour Salted Fish

mauritian recipes food recipes

When I went back home (Mauritius) last month, I told my mom that I wanted to eat salted fish (poisson sale). I love salty foods and one of my favorite Mauritian food recipes is Rougaille Poisson Sale. I had it at least twice during my stay in home with rotis (indian bread)! LOVED IT!

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There was also one other salted fish recipe my mom made, which I never had before. My mom always likes to make up recipes. I particularly love her chocolate cakes, panda cakes, chinese fish with black bean, and oh so many other recipes. Anyway, this salted fish recipe is a sweet and sour one. It’s very easy to make, so if you are in a hurry, you can have it for a quick and easy dinner or lunch dish. Little note I have to point out: there is no need to add salt as we are using salted fish. Otherwise you might end up with an over-salty dish!

Leave a comment down and let me know if you liked it! Don’t forget to check out my other Mauritian Recipes!

mauritian recipes poisson sale african food recipes

Sweet and Sour Salted Fish

Prep Time:5 minutes
Cook time:10 minutes
Total Time:15 minutes

mauritian recipes african food recipes

Ingredients

  • 200 g salted snoek
  • 1 small onion sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp vinegar
  • 1 red chilli sliced in length size
  • 1 green chilli sliced in length size
  • oil for frying

Instructions

    1. Wash the salted snoek to remove the excess salt
    2. Boil for 5 minutes, drain and carefully remove all the snoek bones. Crumble it.

mauritian recipes poisson sale african food recipes

  1. Heat oil in a pan. Fry the fish for about 5 minutes or until brown.
  2. Add onion, garlic, chillies and stir. Fry for 1-2 minutes.
  3. Add sugar, then stir in the vinegar. Mix and remove. Serve!

Comments

  1. says

    I have a dear friend from Mauritius who teaches Mauritian and Indian cooking in peoples’ homes in the Southeast Queensland area (we’re in Australia). I love Ranee’s cooking and I’m sure I’d love yours too. Ranee started out as a lawyer but when her kids came along she found she could do this from home.

    I have no idea what snoek is but this dish looks beautiful!

    • Cindy @ MijoRecipes says

      Thanks Maureen! It’s really great that Ranee is teaching Mauritian cooking. It’s my biggestwish that more people know about mauritian food recipes! You can ask Ranee about snoek or poisson sale (french). I am sure she will know it!

  2. takerester says

    ive done these type of dish, experimental one, there’s a taste difference when u add in the garlic or onion. i tried adding the garlic as the last ingredient, it may sound like hey will it be fried that way? no but it can still be cooked or otherwise its still can be eaten raw for some peopple.. cut it short i always put minced garlic as the last to come in.. as for the sour part i rarely use vinegar, instead i used mango (that has strong sour juice) or middle aged pineapple, just maybe anything that is sour. but mango is the best.. u stir it with the other ingredient until the juice comes out, if u cut the mango into cubes than u can add it before the garlic.. but if not then the garlic has to come first bfore the mango… expriments with which comes first and which comes later.. timing does have a taste

    • Cindy @ MijoRecipes says

      Hi takerester! Interesting idea about using mango as sour juice. I have often used lemon instead of vinegar, but mango juice is a new idea for me. You probably use the green mangoes right?

  3. MIggy stallbom says

    I am also from mauritius and i am very sad that i cannot get Salted snoek here in canada would you know what i could use in it’s place .
    Thanking you in advance .
    Miggy

    • Cindy @ MijoRecipes says

      Hi Miggy, unfortunately I don’t know what you could use as substitute. I guess you could try with some dried fish, but I never really tried it…

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